The Greatest Voyage in the History of Plastic

134,155 notes

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’

It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions?
Sandi Toksvig (via lntelligent, learninglog) (via sideshowknob) (via lindor-truffle) (via justagalwaygirl) (via a-mermaid-soul)

315,989 notes

afunnyfeminist:

alafindumonde:

thecuckoohaslanded:

earthlydreams:

feminismisatrick:

misanthrpologie:

Saving Face (2012), acid attacks on women in Pakistan

Meanwhile, in America, feminists are complaining about how dress codes are oppressive.

You idiots have never experienced oppression, and pray you never do, because this is what it looks like.

As a South Asian American feminist, let me remind everyone that oppression is not a competition.

Just because we fight one type of sexism doesn’t mean we don’t care about other instances of sexism that don’t affect us directly in our day to day lives.

My heart goes out to this woman and the hundreds of other victims like her. I want to educate people about these kinds of incidents. I support organizations that help women like this.

You may think that dress code issues are trivial, but they are related to a larger issue of women’s bodily autonomy, which affects women’s health and safety.

So please, let’s try to bring awareness and bring about change instead of insulting entire groups of people because they are facing issues that are less scary than the one presented.

oppression is not a competition

thank you so much for this wording

Reblogging again because reasons.

I’ve always thought comments like feminismisatrick’s to be vaguely threatening. They’re basically saying we should be satisfied with adults sexualizing our girls, because they could easily be throwing acid in our faces. I’d like to wear what I want and not have to worry about getting acid thrown in my face. Men get to.

(via captain-elliott)

93,958 notes

vernacular-manslaughter:

octospider:

Gwendoline Christie is the actress for Brienne of Tarth in Game of Thrones. She stands at 6 feet 3 inches tall and took swordfighting, horseriding, and stagefighting lessons for her part, as well as gaining 14 pounds of muscle, to accurately portray Brienne. (x)

She was also terrified of cutting her hair because she’d spent her life believing it was one of the only things that would make people see her as feminine despite her height. In an interview with TV Guide she said:

I struggled for a long time with [cutting] my hair, but then I’m grateful for the opportunity to realize that femininity doesn’t have to come from hair or any of those traditional female archetypes of appearance, So, that’s been exciting actually. I can’t speak with any kind of authority whatsoever because I’m just an actor and I only have my opinions, but I do think it’s really refreshing to have a woman depicted on a mainstream TV show that doesn’t obey typical aesthetics of females and the way they have been portrayed in the past. And I’m really excited to be portraying one of those women. And I hope that her popularity signals a greater expansion of people’s views about men and women and that gender types can be more flexible.

(Source: remulsupin, via captain-elliott)